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Since 1913

, the Stanley brand has been an important part of countless adventures and even more shared memories. Through the years we have received thousands of letters letting us know how much our product means to them. For many our product represents a cherished memory of a loved one who has passed or a best friend that never let them down. We are honored to be a part of our fans' lives and are hungry for more. Collected here are many of our favorite Stanley Stories. Check them out. Get inspired and share your own. Our history is yours.

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  • ONE TOUGH THERMOS
    My grandfather got this thermos not long after he went into the Navy in 1944 from my great grandfather, he still had it when he retired Senior Master Chief in 1970, he then took it with him for his 13 years at Texaco. I am not...
    My grandfather got this thermos not long after he went into the Navy in 1944 from my great grandfather, he still had it when he retired Senior Master Chief in 1970, he then took it with him for his 13 years at Texaco. I am not sure how long my great grandfather had it. He gave it to me in 1989 when I started at Boeing and I have used it everyday since, it is the only thing of his that I have so it means a lot to me. Kind of like I get to take him to work with me every day. The handle is gone and has hose clamps holding the "new" handle, the stopper is now cracked, it has dents from one end to the other, has been through 3 wars and lord knows what else.... and it still keeps my coffee hot, even till the next day if I forget about it... Just wanted to say thanks for a great thermos and some good memories. Someday I'd like to find a new stopper for it...
  • THANKS DAD.
    Mum and I were clearing out dads old garage after he had died, so that mum could put the bungalow up for sale and move closer to her family and friends in London. There we found dads old Stanley Flasks among his tools etc. and...
    Mum and I were clearing out dads old garage after he had died, so that mum could put the bungalow up for sale and move closer to her family and friends in London. There we found dads old Stanley Flasks among his tools etc. and it brought a tear to my eyes. I thought of all the times he drove mum and me, to the seaside, so we could have a picnic, play in the sand, swim in the sea, play on the amusements and have a good fun day. Mum would put cold chicken and sausages in one, salad in another and cold boiled potatoes and hard boiled eggs in the third and she would also buy crisps that had little blue bags of salt in them. I have kept all three of them but I have never used them, perhaps next summer I will. Unfortunately though you can never go back. Dad and Mum are both dead now but the great memories of picnics at the seaside will always remain.
  • CLASSIC AMERICAN FAMILY HEIRLOOM
    I carry my Stanley in memory of my father; he died when I was young. At eight years old I attended his funeral, and since I've been hanging on to the memories I have of him, using them as fuel to grow into the man I've become....
    I carry my Stanley in memory of my father; he died when I was young. At eight years old I attended his funeral, and since I've been hanging on to the memories I have of him, using them as fuel to grow into the man I've become. My father, though an MIT grad, was an urban commercial roofer by trade. He was a genius of a man, and blue collar by choice. He loved his job, and he worked really hard at it. (Consequently it was the job he loved that took him from this life). I recall my father coming home from work every day, wearing jeans and a work shirt covered in tar, sweat saturated as evidence of a hard day's labor, and carrying his Stanley in hand. This Americana image of a hard working man sticks with me as an example of how to work, how to perform, and how to live. Though I'm not a professional tradesman myself, rather a "doctor in training," I still hold on to the values taught to me by my father, and I still hold on to his Stanley.
  • A LANDERS NEW BRITAIN STORY
    On of my Dad's first jobs, after leaving the Army in 1946, was with Landers, making Stanley Vacuum bottles. He was really proud off the work he did and the product he helped to make. Landers would make available for employee...
    On of my Dad's first jobs, after leaving the Army in 1946, was with Landers, making Stanley Vacuum bottles. He was really proud off the work he did and the product he helped to make. Landers would make available for employee purchase the products they made and our kitchen had everything Mom needed. We always went on weekend picnics. Dad made his own portable SS BBQ to match his all SS Stanley vacuum beverage dispenser (the same one used on trains). Both became conversation pieces at many of our picnics. Vacations always included the large dispenser, and 2 vacuum bottles, which were stored in a cloth bag, with a metal sandwich storage box tucked in the middle. Even today everything remains safely stored with my Mom, waiting for the next picnic. A great product, a great brand and a great responsibility, you now have. Owning a great brand isn't possible. You become its' caretaker. You have to keep it healthy, make it strong and when the day finally comes, only entrust it to those who have the same passion as you do. Frank McCann femccann@mac.com
  • ROO ROO
    My husband used your thermos everyday until Roo Roo, our 13 month old pitbull puppy, took the cap out of the dish drain, while we were not hime, and chewed it to pieces!! Needless to say, it awful messy to use the thermos with...
    My husband used your thermos everyday until Roo Roo, our 13 month old pitbull puppy, took the cap out of the dish drain, while we were not hime, and chewed it to pieces!! Needless to say, it awful messy to use the thermos with no cap and that is why I am online now, looking for replacement parts and I happened to come across this offer. I really wish I had taken a picture of the mess that day, but I did include one of Roo Roo.
  • THE GREEN BULLET
    Enroute to Washington DC from Fort Hood, TX, in 1978, we stopped in Mississippi and bought our green, Stanley Thermos. With silver #100 lid on top and silver rim around the bottom, it looked very much like an artillery shell,...
    Enroute to Washington DC from Fort Hood, TX, in 1978, we stopped in Mississippi and bought our green, Stanley Thermos. With silver #100 lid on top and silver rim around the bottom, it looked very much like an artillery shell, so we called it "the Green Bullet". It carried coffee on field exercises (I was an infantryman), on TDY tours, and on many PCS moves. I took it to Korea. I used it on the DMZ. When I got home after a year in Korea, my daughter was helping me unload my bags. I told her to be careful and take the "Green Bullet" into the kitchen. I turned back a few moments later and she was still in the same spot, almost to tears. It took a big hug from Daddy to reassure her that the "Green Bullet" was not dangerous, would not explode if she dropped it, and we were all perfectly safe. I am now retired, my daughter is a Mom, and we still use the "Green Bullet" when we go to see the kids. The stopper is a problem, though. It only lasted 32 years, so I have to order a replacement. But the "bullet" itself, with all it's dings and scrapes, is just as good as it was the first day we used it!